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Monday, 22 July 2019 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a common fungal infection. A majority of athlete’s foot cases are caused by fungi that thrive in closed, warm, and moist environments. The fungi feed on Keratin, which is a protein found in the hair, nails, and skin. Athlete’s foot is mildly contagious and can spread through direct contact with the infection and by skin particles left on towels, shoes, or floors. Walking barefoot can increase the chances of contracting athlete’s foot. The risk can also go up depending on your susceptibility. People who have impaired immune systems or diabetes are at greater risk for infection if they have an open cut or sore on their foot. If you have developed athlete’s foot or feel that you may be at risk, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist. 
 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete's Foot 101
Monday, 15 July 2019 00:00

Sports are physical activities, and with all physical activities comes the possibility of injury at some point. The parts of the body that are most prone to injury from sports are the foot and ankle. The most common foot and ankle injuries endured from sports are sprains, tendonitis, fractures and contusions. Other sports related injuries to the ankles and feet include strains, plantar fasciitis, tears in foot and ankle tendons as well as chronic ankle instability. If you are active in sports, it is recommended to see a podiatrist in order to ensure that the feet and ankles are in good shape.


 

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot And Ankle Injuries
Tuesday, 09 July 2019 00:00

The Achilles tendon is located at the back of the calf, and its function is to connect the heel to the calf muscles. It is important for this tendon to remain strong, as it is necessary in performing running and jumping activities. Achilles tendonitis occurs if it becomes irritated, inflamed, or swollen. This can happen for a variety of reasons, including increasing the intensity of a new sport, wearing inappropriate shoes while exercising, or from having tight calf muscles. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this condition can include pain and discomfort near the heel, and some patients may have difficulty in flexing and pointing the injured foot. Effective treatment options can include resting the foot, performing exercises to strengthen the calf muscles, in addition to possibly wearing orthotics. If you feel you have injured your Achilles tendon, it is strongly advised to consult with a podiatrist who can guide you toward proper treatment options.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 08 July 2019 16:41

Dr. Samuel and Dr. Friis completed a cadaver training seminar and were the first to perform the Lapiplasty procedure in the Crozer Keystone Health System at Brinton Lake Surgical Center this past June. They are quite pleased with their outcomes and are excited to add this technique to their practice.  

Lapiplasty is designed to correct bunions by addressing the source of the deformity at the base of the first metatarsal. The 3-dimensional correction makes it much less likely that the bunion returns and the fixation in a Lapiplasty allows for patients to be weight bearing much earlier in the healing process, many times within 7-14 days, following surgery, wearing a walking boot. Lapiplasty may not be for everyone and a thorough evaluation would be required to determine if patients are candidates for this technique. They are both excited to offer this new technique that may enhance their patient’s long term outcomes.

 

lapiplasty

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